San Diego Protects Sewer Systems and Conserves the Environment with Trees

Sep 26

San Diego Protects Sewer Systems and Conserves the Environment with Trees

San Diego is known for its great gardens, parks and even hot-air ballooning in majestic skies. But there’s more. Communities all throughout the city are decidedly protecting the environment, at large, by using trees for the benefit of infrastructure systems and conservation. Recently, the nearby city of Carlsbad approved a project to use the resources an assortment of native plants, including western sycamore, western cottonwood, coast live oak, California blackberry, and more. The city will spend approximately $600,000 for these improvements for the environment. The project is part of the city’s Habitat Management Plan, which is designed to preserve and protect sensitive biological resources within the city. San Diego is also in the process of inspecting its sewer system citywide, using small cameras to check inside the lines for corrosion and damage. Recently, San Diego was included in a group of seven cities that were selected to be a part of an initiative to promote water and energy efficiency. The Pure Water Program is a phased, multiyear program that will ultimately make available 93,000 acre-feet of water per year, or approximately 30 percent of the City of San Diego’s water supply, by 2035. The first two phases of the Pure Water San Diego Program are expected to produce more than 33,600 acre-feet of water suitable for reuse. Through the Pure Water Program, the city expects to increase the amount of reclaimed water, thereby reducing the amount of wastewater that is released into the ocean. Many treatment facilities are also taking an active stance on behalf of the preservation of existing infrastructure, while also considering the impacts of climate change. Interesting fact: Carlsbad’s Lake Calavera Preserve is the largest of the city’s 13 managed nature preserves. The 400-acre lake is a man-made reservoir that stores 520 acre-feet of water. The Calavera Dam provides flood control for the area by keeping the Lake Calavera Reservoir...

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San Diego Successful Strategy for Sewer Conditioning

May 04

San Diego Successful Strategy for Sewer Conditioning

San Diego is part of a semi-arid coastal desert environment that averages only 9.3 inches of rainfall annually. Less than one-fourth of San Diego’s water is of local origin, collected as runoff in the City’s nine reservoirs. The City is participating in a Water Conservation Program that consists of a diverse strategy aimed at reducing San Diego’s dependency and demand on imported water.  Profitable, cost- effective measures have been achieved by creating a water conservation plan that includes using water saving techniques in everyday life, adopting beneficial programs, and applying policies and ordinances designed to promote water conservation practices. Another initiative the City has had successes in is the Sewer Spill Reduction Program. This program aims to use aggressive strategies in the prevention of sewer overflows. The key elements of the program include cleaning all 3,000 miles of the Municipal Sewerage System and developing a system-wide cleaning schedule; televising and assessing the condition of more than 1,200 miles of the oldest and most problematic sewer lines in the system; and increasing the miles of sewer lines, replaced or rehabilitated, from 15 miles per year to 45 miles per year. The results of the program have been remarkable and have assisted in San Diego’s overall efforts in sewer spill reduction. The program’s success is also seen in the reduction of beach closures as a result of sewer spills. Interesting fact: The Port of San Diego is the fourth largest of the 11 ports in California. It was created by the state legislature in 1962. Did you know, four 69-foot tall beer tanks recently arrived at the Port of San Diego? The 24-ton fermentation and storage tanks will be used to brew all of the main production beers in Miramar. Certified Installers take note: Perma-Liner Industries would like to invite you to our Refresher Training (Perma-Lateral™ specific) that will take place on July 12th and 13th at our Clearwater facility!! Please plan on attending. Register by calling 1-866-336-2568 or Click Here! See you...

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Sewer System Record Keeping For UC at San Diego

Oct 21

Sewer System Record Keeping For UC at San Diego

The University of California at San Diego has a task oriented and carefully documented system for reporting sanitary sewer overflows when they occur. The goal for the UC San Diego’s Sewer System Management Plan is to schedule and properly manage, operate, and maintain all parts of the sanitary sewer system, as well as to identify effective notification and response procedures that will be used to address sanitary sewer overflows (SSOs). The Environment, Health & Safety Department is required to maintain detailed documentation of SSOs for at least five years. Maintaining these records will help EH&S track the number of spills and their volumes, as well as, measure the effectiveness of the Overflow Emergency Response Plan (OERP). Based on the information collected EH&S can determine which areas of the sewer system need to be prioritized and if the OERP needs to be updated in order to improve response activities. For each SSO these records must include, but are not limited to, Records documenting each sanitary sewer overflow event; Complaint records documenting how necessary departments responded to all notifications of possible or actually sanitary sewer overflows, both during and after business hours, including complaints that do not result in a sanitary sewer overflow; Records documenting steps and/or remedial actions taken. Spill response activities taken; Records documenting how all estimate(s) of volume(s) discharged and, if applicable, volume(s)recovered were calculated; Electronic monitoring records relied upon for documenting sanitary sewer overflow events and/or estimating the sanitary sewer overflow volume discharged. Whether or not health warnings were posted; Steps that have, and will be, taken to prevent the SSO from recurring and a schedule to implement those steps; work orders, work completed, and any other maintenance records that are associated with responses and investigations of system problems related to...

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