San Diego’s Safe, Sound and Sustainable Recycled Water

May 19

San Diego’s Safe, Sound and Sustainable Recycled Water

In San Diego, recycled water has become a resourceful and useful means of local water supply. The recycled water is used to irrigate fairgrounds, golf courses, parks, as well as school properties. Recently, the Reclamation system was upgraded to include an additional reservoir, as well as more distribution pipelines. The advanced water treatment system has greatly improved the city’s recycled water quality. Additionally, the recycled water salinity levels have been significantly reduced, which is a major benefit for homeowners using the water for irrigation. The arid San Diego area relies heavily on water imported from the Colorado River and Northern California. Recycled water is a constructive way to help the community conserve water. The city has also experimented with capturing urban runoff to protect beaches and lagoons, then redirecting that water to the sewer system for treatment and reuse. Water conservation will remain an important priority for San Diego neighborhoods. Because of this, the city has reinvented the mainstream car washing method by using technology which recycles water and filters it for future use. This technique will save up to three-quarters of the water that patrons would normally use at home. A typical at-home car wash uses approximately 140 gallons of water. Furthermore, the water used at home drains directly into local waterways, along with the chemicals in the water. The water that is not recycled at a public car wash is sent to the sewer system for further processing, safeguarding the waterways and local wildlife from contaminants. San Diego, you’re invited!! Perma-Liner Industries requests your attendance at our Open House in Anaheim, CA. It’s taking place for three days from June 13th –June 15th and we want to see you there! It’ll be chock-full of live demonstrations and information on all of the CIPP technology available. Don’t miss this! Call us to confirm your reservation @...

Read More

San Diego’s Sensible Water Leak Conservation: Perks Included!

Mar 21

San Diego’s Sensible Water Leak Conservation: Perks Included!

Residents of America’s Finest City will be able to take part in a variety of fun, resourceful events this month. It’s Fix a Leak Week and there are several activities and promotions happening city-wide! Also, San Diegans may be able to take part in a financial incentive on water leak repairs. Did you know that household leaks are estimated to waste more than 1 trillion gallons of water a year- nationwide? That’s enough to serve the annual needs of 11 million homes. This is a well-heeled reminder to check for any undetected leaks throughout your home. Consider your sinks, bathtubs, showers and anywhere you may have a water apparatus, including your water meter. Many meters have a small, red leak detector that spins when water is being used, which may quickly detect small indoor leaks once all water sources are turned off. Irrigation systems can also leak so you’ll want to be sure and check those as well, particularly now that spring has arrived. During this season water usage generally increases, making it an opportune time to check for leaks. The presence of mold or algae near irrigation fixtures can signal a leak. Similarly, look for continually damp spots in the yard as that can also be a tell-tale sign of an underground leak. Interestingly, even small 1/32 inch leaks can contribute to significant water waste- over six thousand gallons per month! In the event that a repair is needed, the good news is: you may qualify for a rebate as the city is offering customers up to $75 for repairs made throughout this month. Water saving tip: If there is a need to replace an appliance, low water use models are recommended as you’ll find an improvement of up to 20 percent less water- without a noticeable difference in...

Read More

San Diego Safeguards Water with Smart Planting

Jan 04

San Diego Safeguards Water with Smart Planting

San Diego is one of the many cities across California that is well-suited for the use of landscaping as a means of conservation.  Many local residents are intent on taking part in a workshop the city is now offering. The program is designed to assist homeowners with smart planting tactics, specific to the ongoing climate advisories.  The workshop is free of charge and will provide homeowners with the basic ‘how-to’ for water saving landscape reassembling. Information will be provided on soil, design, turf removal, plant selection, planning, irrigation, implementation and more. These are all the elements needed for a water-efficient landscape. Not surprisingly, many plants that would be inherent to a Mediterranean climate are also adapted for San Diego’s climate. A Mediterranean landscape is characterized by dramatic variations in ecological conditions, often over short distances. Similarly, the San Diego terrain can be depicted in the same likeness. Because of the unique water conservation challenge San Diego faces, the city has also devised a manual to be used as a point of reference to comply with planting guidelines and proper irrigation. Climate appropriate plants with lower water needs, along with the use of an updated irrigation system, will equal a conscientious and cost-effective plan.   Perma-liner Industries is also part of a better solution for the environment and waterways. We’ve manufactured systems to work hand-in-hand with your landscaping efforts. Let us take care of the pipelines underneath your home that can sometimes get overburdened with tree roots and soil erosion, causing malfunctions. No need to worry! We can help before a problem arises. We are the trenchless brand that keeps your landscaping intact. Our products use curing methods that take a matter of hours, instead of the days, which means no displacement for you! Call us or go online to schedule an evaluation of your home’s pipelining system. www.perma-liner.com /...

Read More

San Diego Protects Sewer Systems and Conserves the Environment with Trees

Sep 26

San Diego Protects Sewer Systems and Conserves the Environment with Trees

San Diego is known for its great gardens, parks and even hot-air ballooning in majestic skies. But there’s more. Communities all throughout the city are decidedly protecting the environment, at large, by using trees for the benefit of infrastructure systems and conservation. Recently, the nearby city of Carlsbad approved a project to use the resources an assortment of native plants, including western sycamore, western cottonwood, coast live oak, California blackberry, and more. The city will spend approximately $600,000 for these improvements for the environment. The project is part of the city’s Habitat Management Plan, which is designed to preserve and protect sensitive biological resources within the city. San Diego is also in the process of inspecting its sewer system citywide, using small cameras to check inside the lines for corrosion and damage. Recently, San Diego was included in a group of seven cities that were selected to be a part of an initiative to promote water and energy efficiency. The Pure Water Program is a phased, multiyear program that will ultimately make available 93,000 acre-feet of water per year, or approximately 30 percent of the City of San Diego’s water supply, by 2035. The first two phases of the Pure Water San Diego Program are expected to produce more than 33,600 acre-feet of water suitable for reuse. Through the Pure Water Program, the city expects to increase the amount of reclaimed water, thereby reducing the amount of wastewater that is released into the ocean. Many treatment facilities are also taking an active stance on behalf of the preservation of existing infrastructure, while also considering the impacts of climate change. Interesting fact: Carlsbad’s Lake Calavera Preserve is the largest of the city’s 13 managed nature preserves. The 400-acre lake is a man-made reservoir that stores 520 acre-feet of water. The Calavera Dam provides flood control for the area by keeping the Lake Calavera Reservoir...

Read More

History of Drought and Flooding: San Francisco, San Diego

Jun 14

History of Drought and Flooding: San Francisco, San Diego

From San Francisco all the way down to San Diego and throughout the state, storms are getting weaker in terms of how much precipitation there is per day (in each storm). However, the storms are getting longer. Storms last an extra day or a few days longer. All over the state people are also having trouble with their groundwater. Every time the temperature goes up 1 degree, the potential evaporation increases by 4 percent. Scientists have analyzed the drought and estimated approximately 20 percent of the drought was caused, not by lack of rain, but by the temperature which caused the rain to evaporate. In parts of California, such as Santa Cruz, the El Niño was the largest ever observed which lead to 150–200 percent of normal precipitation. In January, the wettest month of the year, cities such as Sacramento got 1/100 of an inch of rain. Studies have predicted that a normal winter, which is four months long with rain in December, January, February and March will shrink to two months. A helpful tactic will be to install reservoirs and holding tanks in order to slow water as it goes down the hill and give it a chance to soak in. This will compensate for some of the climate change effects. Climate scientists also predict the region will get even hotter and drier. California has only about a year and a half’s supply saved behind dams and groundwater tables have dropped in a distinctive way. The number of Californians exposed to risk from a hundred-year flood could rise from the current 260,000 to 480,000 by 2100, attributed to a projected sea-level rise of 4.6 feet. Storms are expected to get more severe, with increased risk of flooding. Contact Perma Liner for all of your Cured In Place Pipelining...

Read More

San Diego’s Winter Water Usage Advisory

Dec 28

San Diego’s Winter Water Usage Advisory

In the City of San Diego, everyone has a San Diego water bill that includes a flat sewer rate. The rate is based on the water used during the previous winter. Instead of charging each customer a flat dollar amount, the city attaches an amount based on your usage, which covers the cost of running the sewer system. The City has implemented a winter monitoring period to calculate sewer charges on your bill from December through March. Once the monitoring period is over, a flat rate for your sewer bill is calculated and included in your monthly bill for the next year beginning in July and continuing through the following July. Essentially, if you lower your usage during these months, your sewer rate will go down and you will save money each month for one year. The winter months are when the measuring takes place because that is when the highest percentage of water used is returned to the sewer system. The City monitors your water usage during the two billing cycles when your meter is actually read, and uses the total from the cycle with the least amount of usage to calculate your sewer rate. Residential water users are urged to keep up their efforts to conserve through the winter months. That includes complying with urban water supplier directives to switch to fall watering schedules of once a week as well as a prohibition against watering during a rain event and 48 hours directly following a rain event. Water saving tips: Turn off the tap while brushing your teeth. (save up to 35 gallons a week per person) Scrape food scraps off dishes in the garbage instead of putting it down the garbage disposal. (save up to 60 gallons a week) Shorten your shower time at least every other day. (save up to 33 gallons a week per...

Read More