California Cities Setup Cultivated Use of Water

Dec 09

California Cities Setup Cultivated Use of Water

Many cities throughout California are conscientious of recycling and have been for the long term. But recycling water has now become a magnified topic as the drought persists. Recently researchers at UCLA have addressed the topic of recycled water being collected from sewer systems and then purified. At first glance, it may sound appealing. However it is a resourceful-even novel- idea as this form of water can be used to irrigate places like parks, lawns and golf courses. The subsequent health benefits of this process are not only being observed but commended. A study has analyzed the varying methods that California gets its water, from the removal of salts and minerals to conveying it from the Colorado River. An integrated approach has accounted for environmental impacts and the amount of energy each method consumes. An assessment of health, illnesses from air pollution, as well as the effects of climate change, were calculated to form a conclusion: recycled water can be used to an advantage. Those benefits become apparent when used in addition to Xeriscaping or using drought resistant plants. Many homeowners have initiated this favorable element in the effort to conserve water. Neighborhoods have become increasingly aware of the collective gain particular plants can have as a means of saving water and preventing urban runoff that pollutes waterways and beaches. Additionally, underserved neighborhoods often have few public parks and open spaces, making recycled water an environmental perk as it promotes a greener space. Interestingly, more than half of California’s residential water use goes to the irrigation of lawns and landscape. However, even with modern technology in full swing, the challenge may still be adapting to a notion that waste water can now be purified to a level that eliminates health hazards. A recent survey shows that 76 percent of Californians support recycled water as a long-term solution, notwithstanding the current drought conditions or an improvement in the future. Recycled water requires its own system and many municipalities are also taking advantage of the available incentives for using recycled...

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History of Drought and Flooding: San Francisco, San Diego

Jun 14

History of Drought and Flooding: San Francisco, San Diego

From San Francisco all the way down to San Diego and throughout the state, storms are getting weaker in terms of how much precipitation there is per day (in each storm). However, the storms are getting longer. Storms last an extra day or a few days longer. All over the state people are also having trouble with their groundwater. Every time the temperature goes up 1 degree, the potential evaporation increases by 4 percent. Scientists have analyzed the drought and estimated approximately 20 percent of the drought was caused, not by lack of rain, but by the temperature which caused the rain to evaporate. In parts of California, such as Santa Cruz, the El Niño was the largest ever observed which lead to 150–200 percent of normal precipitation. In January, the wettest month of the year, cities such as Sacramento got 1/100 of an inch of rain. Studies have predicted that a normal winter, which is four months long with rain in December, January, February and March will shrink to two months. A helpful tactic will be to install reservoirs and holding tanks in order to slow water as it goes down the hill and give it a chance to soak in. This will compensate for some of the climate change effects. Climate scientists also predict the region will get even hotter and drier. California has only about a year and a half’s supply saved behind dams and groundwater tables have dropped in a distinctive way. The number of Californians exposed to risk from a hundred-year flood could rise from the current 260,000 to 480,000 by 2100, attributed to a projected sea-level rise of 4.6 feet. Storms are expected to get more severe, with increased risk of flooding. Contact Perma Liner for all of your Cured In Place Pipelining...

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