San Diego’s Safe, Sound and Sustainable Recycled Water

May 19

San Diego’s Safe, Sound and Sustainable Recycled Water

In San Diego, recycled water has become a resourceful and useful means of local water supply. The recycled water is used to irrigate fairgrounds, golf courses, parks, as well as school properties. Recently, the Reclamation system was upgraded to include an additional reservoir, as well as more distribution pipelines. The advanced water treatment system has greatly improved the city’s recycled water quality. Additionally, the recycled water salinity levels have been significantly reduced, which is a major benefit for homeowners using the water for irrigation. The arid San Diego area relies heavily on water imported from the Colorado River and Northern California. Recycled water is a constructive way to help the community conserve water. The city has also experimented with capturing urban runoff to protect beaches and lagoons, then redirecting that water to the sewer system for treatment and reuse. Water conservation will remain an important priority for San Diego neighborhoods. Because of this, the city has reinvented the mainstream car washing method by using technology which recycles water and filters it for future use. This technique will save up to three-quarters of the water that patrons would normally use at home. A typical at-home car wash uses approximately 140 gallons of water. Furthermore, the water used at home drains directly into local waterways, along with the chemicals in the water. The water that is not recycled at a public car wash is sent to the sewer system for further processing, safeguarding the waterways and local wildlife from contaminants. San Diego, you’re invited!! Perma-Liner Industries requests your attendance at our Open House in Anaheim, CA. It’s taking place for three days from June 13th –June 15th and we want to see you there! It’ll be chock-full of live demonstrations and information on all of the CIPP technology available. Don’t miss this! Call us to confirm your reservation @...

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San Diego’s Sensible Water Leak Conservation: Perks Included!

Mar 21

San Diego’s Sensible Water Leak Conservation: Perks Included!

Residents of America’s Finest City will be able to take part in a variety of fun, resourceful events this month. It’s Fix a Leak Week and there are several activities and promotions happening city-wide! Also, San Diegans may be able to take part in a financial incentive on water leak repairs. Did you know that household leaks are estimated to waste more than 1 trillion gallons of water a year- nationwide? That’s enough to serve the annual needs of 11 million homes. This is a well-heeled reminder to check for any undetected leaks throughout your home. Consider your sinks, bathtubs, showers and anywhere you may have a water apparatus, including your water meter. Many meters have a small, red leak detector that spins when water is being used, which may quickly detect small indoor leaks once all water sources are turned off. Irrigation systems can also leak so you’ll want to be sure and check those as well, particularly now that spring has arrived. During this season water usage generally increases, making it an opportune time to check for leaks. The presence of mold or algae near irrigation fixtures can signal a leak. Similarly, look for continually damp spots in the yard as that can also be a tell-tale sign of an underground leak. Interestingly, even small 1/32 inch leaks can contribute to significant water waste- over six thousand gallons per month! In the event that a repair is needed, the good news is: you may qualify for a rebate as the city is offering customers up to $75 for repairs made throughout this month. Water saving tip: If there is a need to replace an appliance, low water use models are recommended as you’ll find an improvement of up to 20 percent less water- without a noticeable difference in...

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San Diego Safeguards Water with Smart Planting

Jan 04

San Diego Safeguards Water with Smart Planting

San Diego is one of the many cities across California that is well-suited for the use of landscaping as a means of conservation.  Many local residents are intent on taking part in a workshop the city is now offering. The program is designed to assist homeowners with smart planting tactics, specific to the ongoing climate advisories.  The workshop is free of charge and will provide homeowners with the basic ‘how-to’ for water saving landscape reassembling. Information will be provided on soil, design, turf removal, plant selection, planning, irrigation, implementation and more. These are all the elements needed for a water-efficient landscape. Not surprisingly, many plants that would be inherent to a Mediterranean climate are also adapted for San Diego’s climate. A Mediterranean landscape is characterized by dramatic variations in ecological conditions, often over short distances. Similarly, the San Diego terrain can be depicted in the same likeness. Because of the unique water conservation challenge San Diego faces, the city has also devised a manual to be used as a point of reference to comply with planting guidelines and proper irrigation. Climate appropriate plants with lower water needs, along with the use of an updated irrigation system, will equal a conscientious and cost-effective plan.   Perma-liner Industries is also part of a better solution for the environment and waterways. We’ve manufactured systems to work hand-in-hand with your landscaping efforts. Let us take care of the pipelines underneath your home that can sometimes get overburdened with tree roots and soil erosion, causing malfunctions. No need to worry! We can help before a problem arises. We are the trenchless brand that keeps your landscaping intact. Our products use curing methods that take a matter of hours, instead of the days, which means no displacement for you! Call us or go online to schedule an evaluation of your home’s pipelining system. www.perma-liner.com /...

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California Cities Setup Cultivated Use of Water

Dec 09

California Cities Setup Cultivated Use of Water

Many cities throughout California are conscientious of recycling and have been for the long term. But recycling water has now become a magnified topic as the drought persists. Recently researchers at UCLA have addressed the topic of recycled water being collected from sewer systems and then purified. At first glance, it may sound appealing. However it is a resourceful-even novel- idea as this form of water can be used to irrigate places like parks, lawns and golf courses. The subsequent health benefits of this process are not only being observed but commended. A study has analyzed the varying methods that California gets its water, from the removal of salts and minerals to conveying it from the Colorado River. An integrated approach has accounted for environmental impacts and the amount of energy each method consumes. An assessment of health, illnesses from air pollution, as well as the effects of climate change, were calculated to form a conclusion: recycled water can be used to an advantage. Those benefits become apparent when used in addition to Xeriscaping or using drought resistant plants. Many homeowners have initiated this favorable element in the effort to conserve water. Neighborhoods have become increasingly aware of the collective gain particular plants can have as a means of saving water and preventing urban runoff that pollutes waterways and beaches. Additionally, underserved neighborhoods often have few public parks and open spaces, making recycled water an environmental perk as it promotes a greener space. Interestingly, more than half of California’s residential water use goes to the irrigation of lawns and landscape. However, even with modern technology in full swing, the challenge may still be adapting to a notion that waste water can now be purified to a level that eliminates health hazards. A recent survey shows that 76 percent of Californians support recycled water as a long-term solution, notwithstanding the current drought conditions or an improvement in the future. Recycled water requires its own system and many municipalities are also taking advantage of the available incentives for using recycled...

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Know your Sewer System- Prepare for a Disaster

Nov 09

Know your Sewer System- Prepare for a Disaster

When a natural disaster occurs, it’s important to know how to protect yourself and your belongings. It’s a good idea to know the basics in order to be safe and prepared.  Be sure to strap down your water heater so it meets safety codes. Consider hiring a professional plumber for this.  In California, when an earthquake strikes you’ll need to identify the location of your home’s water, gas and electric main shutoffs valves and switches.  Remove all flammable liquids from the living areas of your home. Put them in the garage or another outside storage area. To help prevent a fire, store them away from heat sources, such as a water heater or furnace. If your home has a chimney, consider securing it to the roof with sheet metal straps.  For flooding, in addition to sandbagging and other preventative measures, be sure to review your policy and know what’s covered in the event of property damage. Also, make sure your septic tank and sewer are inspected and cleaned at the start of every season. During periods of heavy rainfall, clogged sewers and overtaxed septic tanks are disasters waiting to happen. Consider installing a sump pump to drain out unwanted standing water. There are a few helpful items to have in a disaster preparedness kit- such as blankets, clean clothes, flashlights and a respiratory mask, to name a few. California: Are you ready for this? We are excited to inform you that Perma-liner Industries will be in town on December 6th– 8th for our Trenchless Tour!! We’ve been planning for three fun-filled days of Live Demonstrations in Concord. Every day will consist of different demos using our patented technology including Perma-Main™ Continuous Lining, Top Gun and Sectional Point Repair and much more. It’s the educational event of the season and we’d like to see you there!!  Stay tuned for more info or go to www.perma-liner.com....

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San Diego Protects Sewer Systems and Conserves the Environment with Trees

Sep 26

San Diego Protects Sewer Systems and Conserves the Environment with Trees

San Diego is known for its great gardens, parks and even hot-air ballooning in majestic skies. But there’s more. Communities all throughout the city are decidedly protecting the environment, at large, by using trees for the benefit of infrastructure systems and conservation. Recently, the nearby city of Carlsbad approved a project to use the resources an assortment of native plants, including western sycamore, western cottonwood, coast live oak, California blackberry, and more. The city will spend approximately $600,000 for these improvements for the environment. The project is part of the city’s Habitat Management Plan, which is designed to preserve and protect sensitive biological resources within the city. San Diego is also in the process of inspecting its sewer system citywide, using small cameras to check inside the lines for corrosion and damage. Recently, San Diego was included in a group of seven cities that were selected to be a part of an initiative to promote water and energy efficiency. The Pure Water Program is a phased, multiyear program that will ultimately make available 93,000 acre-feet of water per year, or approximately 30 percent of the City of San Diego’s water supply, by 2035. The first two phases of the Pure Water San Diego Program are expected to produce more than 33,600 acre-feet of water suitable for reuse. Through the Pure Water Program, the city expects to increase the amount of reclaimed water, thereby reducing the amount of wastewater that is released into the ocean. Many treatment facilities are also taking an active stance on behalf of the preservation of existing infrastructure, while also considering the impacts of climate change. Interesting fact: Carlsbad’s Lake Calavera Preserve is the largest of the city’s 13 managed nature preserves. The 400-acre lake is a man-made reservoir that stores 520 acre-feet of water. The Calavera Dam provides flood control for the area by keeping the Lake Calavera Reservoir...

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